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the world as I see it

Then and Now – View from Hotel de Oriente

Posted by BCS on September 30, 2008

As I’ve mentioned in yesterday’s post, I was quite surprised when I found out what the view was like from the windows at the back of Hotel de Oriente in 1890 considering that Plaza Calderon de la Barca was already pretty much developed at the time.

With Hotel de Oriente fronting the plaza, it could only mean that the hotel’s back was facing towards the direction of C.M. Recto Avenue of today (considering that Hotel de Oriente’s building’s footprint was rectangular). If you’ve been to that area, I think you’d be as surprised as I was.

This was the view from Hotel de Oriente in 1890:

//www.lib.umich.edu/)

View from Hotel de Oriente in 1890 (courtesy of http://www.lib.umich.edu/)

Current map showing the location of what was once the Hotel de Oriente (map courtesy of www.directorymanila.net).

Current map showing the location of what was once the Hotel de Oriente (map courtesy of http://www.directorymanila.net).

And here’s how the area looks now:

This is what the surroundings of Alvarado Street in Binondo looks like as of September 27, 2008 (as viewed from the bridge on Reina Regente Street). It really has not changed much in the past decade or so...

This is what the surroundings of Alvarado Street in Binondo looks like as of September 27, 2008 (as viewed from the bridge on Reina Regente Street). It really has not changed much in the past decade or so...

Map showing the area seen in the above photo (map courtesy of www.directorymanila.net).

Map showing the area seen in the above photo (map courtesy of http://www.directorymanila.net).

And this:

This is what the surroundings of Alvarado Street in Binondo looks like as of September 27, 2008. It really has not changed much in the past decade or so...

This is what the surroundings of Alvarado Street in Binondo looks like as of September 27, 2008. It really has not changed much in the past decade or so...

Map showing the area seen in the above photo (map courtesy of www.directorymanila.net).

Map showing the area seen in the above photo (map courtesy of http://www.directorymanila.net).

Note (on the use of old images):

Based on the “Access and Use Policy” on http://www.lib.umich.edu/ (from which I got the old image):

“Users are free to cite and link to digital content without asking for permission.

Users are free to download, copy, and distribute works in the public domain without asking for permission. To determine whether a work is in the public domain, see the section on the public domain of the Copyright & Fair Use site of Stanford University Libraries.”

Regarding “public domain”:

“ABSOLUTELY FREE! MUSIC, TEXT AND ART!! COPY ALL YOU WANT!! If you saw an advertisement like this, you might wonder, “What’s the catch?” When it comes to the public domain, there is no catch. If a book, song, movie or artwork is in the public domain, then it is not protected by intellectual property laws (such as copyright, trademark or patent law) –which means it’s free for you to use without permission.

As a general rule, most works enter the public domain because of old age. This includes any work published in the United States before 1923. Another large block of works are in the public domain because they were published before 1964 and copyright was not renewed. (Renewal was a requirement for works published before 1978.) A smaller group of works fell into the public domain because they were published without copyright notice (copyright notice was necessary for works published in the United States before March 1, 1989). Some works are in the public domain because the owner has indicated a desire to give them to the public without copyright protection. The rules establishing the public domain status for each of these types of works are different and more details are provided throughout this chapter.”

Regarding “fair use”:

“In its most general sense, a fair use is any copying of copyrighted material done for a limited and “transformative” purpose such as to comment upon, criticize or parody a copyrighted work. Such uses can be done without permission from the copyright owner. Another way of putting this is that fair use is a defense against infringement. If your use qualifies under the definition above, and as defined more specifically in this section, then your use would not be considered an illegal infringement.”

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