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Archive for the ‘Then and Now’ Category

Then and Now – Binondo Canal Lift Bridge

Posted by BCS on November 24, 2008

I thought I was not going to be able to post this particular entry as I’ve not heard from the University of Washington Libraries since I sent them my formal request (for permission to use the old image) close to a month ago.

However, quite unexpectedly, I received a letter from them last Wednesday granting me the permission I requested. For this, I thank Nicolette Bromberg, Visual Materials Curator of the University of Washington Libraries.

The Binondo Canal and the Lift Bridge in 1913 (Image courtesy of University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections, INC0069)

The Binondo Canal and the Lift Bridge in 1913 (Image courtesy of University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections, INC0069)

The place as it appears now (Photo taken on September 27, 2008)

The place as it appears now (Photo taken on September 27, 2008)

If you’ve seen my earlier post on the Binondo Canal, the photos above are towards the other direction of the photos on that post.

If you look closely at the center of the old image, you’ll notice a steel-frame structure spanning the canal/estero… that is a “lift bridge”. I’ve seen some close-up shots of the bridge somewhere, unfortunately I haven’t been able to obtain permissions to post them.

Anyway, the only information I can find on the “lift bridge” is from the ICOMOS Philippines blog/website which states:

“Covering only a small distance, roughly about 15 meters, the bridge over the Estero de Binondo in Manila is unique due to its ability to lift its platform from the ground to accommodate passing boats or cascos. The Lift Bridge inaugurated in 1913 was the only one of its kind in the country. Spared from the destruction that befell most of colonial Manila during the Liberation, the Lift Bridge of Estero de Binondo was until recently the only link to both banks of the estero along Calle Dasmariñas until, its subsequent replacement by the most beautiful of all DPWH bridges, the standard concrete bridge.”

The concrete bridge in Calle Dasmariñas today (crossing Estero de Binondo/Binondo Canal) - Photo taken on September 27, 2008

The concrete bridge in Calle Dasmariñas today (crossing Estero de Binondo/Binondo Canal) - Photo taken on September 27, 2008

Note: Conditions for the use of the old image as stipulated in the letter received from the University of Washington Libraries:

“[Permission is granted for] non-exclusive rights for one-time use of the University of Washington Libraries image INC0069 (Binondo Canal) for use in the Then and Now – Binondo Canal Lift Bridge website.

“The image is licensed to be used only by [BCS] for use in the website Then and Now – Binondo Canal Lift Bridge or for promotional materials related to it. The image on the website shall appear no larger than 72 dpi if shown as a still image, and the image may not be reused, sold, altered, or loaned without written permission of the University of Washington Libraries.”

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Then and Now – Lawton Residence

Posted by BCS on October 30, 2008

//www.lib.umich.edu/)

The Lawton Residence in 1899 (photo taken from the Puente de Ayala) - Photo courtesy of the University of Michigan Library (http://www.lib.umich.edu/)

Somewhere along this bank of the Pasig River, most likely on an area captured within the frame of this photo, once stood the residence of Henry W. Lawton and his family (Photo taken on September 27, 2008)

Somewhere along this bank of the Pasig River, most likely on an area captured within the frame of this photo, once stood the residence of Henry W. Lawton and his family (Photo taken on September 27, 2008)

Note: Plaza Lawton, now known as Liwasang Bonifacio, was named after Major-General Henry Ware Lawton who was transferred to the Philippines to command the 1st Division, VIII Corps during the Philippine-American War.

Note on the use of the old photograph:

From the University of Michigan Library website:

“Users are free to cite and link to digital content without asking for permission.

“Users are free to download, copy, and distribute works in the public domain without asking for permission. To determine whether a work is in the public domain, see the section on the public domain of the Copyright & Fair Use site of Stanford University Libraries.”

Posted in History, People, Then and Now | Tagged: , , , , , | 5 Comments »

Then and Now – The Ayuntamiento

Posted by BCS on October 29, 2008

//www.lib.umich.edu/)

The Ayuntamiento in 1902 - Photo courtesy of the University of Michigan Library (http://www.lib.umich.edu/)

The Ayuntamiento today (Photo taken on September 27, 2008)

The Ayuntamiento today (Photo taken on September 27, 2008)

It has been said that the Ayuntamiento was once THE grandest and most majestic structure in the whole of Intramuros.

According to Traveler on Foot’s post entitled “The Nostalgic Plaza Roma”, it was in this building where the Spanish Governor General Fermin Jaudenes and American General Wesley Merrit signed official change of colonial power.

This building was also the venue of the first session of the First Philippine Assembly which was held in October 19, 1907.

It’s sad that it’s left in its “ruined” state up to now considering that the late President Marcos issued a Letter of Instruction in 1979 ordering for the Ayuntamiento to be “restored, as much as possible to conform to their appearance during the Spanish Regime”. The LOI also ordered for the structure to be “estored as much as possible to their original condition, with particular attention to the Marble Hall, the staircase and vestibule, the former Session Hall of the Supreme Court and the former offices of the Governors-General.”

More information about the Ayuntamiento can be found on http://intramuros2007.wordpress.com.

Note on the use of the old photograph:

From the University of Michigan Library website:

“Users are free to cite and link to digital content without asking for permission.

“Users are free to download, copy, and distribute works in the public domain without asking for permission. To determine whether a work is in the public domain, see the section on the public domain of the Copyright & Fair Use site of Stanford University Libraries.”

Posted in Architecture, History, Landmarks, Then and Now | Tagged: , , , , , | 4 Comments »